nutmeg

Nutmeg: flavors food, makes it more digestible, and helps to sterilize food by killing or deterring potentially harmful microorganisms ...

Common Names: Nutmeg

Botanical Name: Myristca fragrans

Family: Myristicaceae

Plant Type: Evergreen tree

Parts Used: Seeds

Nutmeg is an evergreen tree native to the Moluca Islands, and is found in humid locations.

Description: The tree grows to a height of about 60 - 100 feet, has large, fragrant, dark-green leaves and small yellow flowers that develop into yellow fruits resembling apricots. The fruit contains a dark brown seed inside. The seed is surrounded with a net-like substance, which is known as mace. The fruits mature after about nine years. The male and female flowers are on different trees. The male flowers are white in color.

Cultivation: Nutmeg is a tropical evergreen tree growing in the Spice Islands.

Harvesting: The fruits mature after about nine years. They can then be gathered up to three times a year. The mace is the outer covering of the fruit, and is dried separately from the kernels. Oil can be extracted, or the nutmegs sold whole or ground.

Culinary Uses: Use in baking quick breads and desserts. Add a pinch to cream and cheese sauces, toss it in eggnog and add to the cabbage family of vegetables.

Nutmeg Magick

Luck. Money. Health. Fidelity

Gender: Masculine

Planet: Jupiter

Element: Fire

To ensure your lover's fidelity: cut a nutmeg into exactly four pieces. Bury one part in the Earth; throw one off a cliff into the air; burn the third part; and boil the last in water. Drink a sip of the water and take this last piece of nutmeg with you everywhere; sleep with it under your pillow at night. No one will tempt your mate.

Herbal Healing with Nutmeg

Medicinal Actions: Abortifacient, analgesic, antibacterial, antiemetic, anti-oxidant, antirheumetic, antiseptic, antispasmodic, aperitive, aphrodisiac, astringent, calmative, cardiac, carminative, digestive, emmenagogue, estrogenic, expectorant, invigorating, laxative, reviving, sedative, stimulant (circulatory system), stomachic, tonic, uplifting, warming

Medicinal Uses: Nutmeg is a pleasant digestive with a slightly sedative aspect. It helps to dispel nausea, and can be used to offset sickness when someone is using nausea-inducing drugs. In small amounts, it is a valuable herb for convalescents, both stimulating the appetite and helping to ease the irritability that can sometimes accompany slow recovery.

Caution: An overdose of Myristica can cause nightmares or hallucinations. Do not use more than a pinch of grated nutmeg at a time.

Herbal Healing with Nutmeg

  • To aid digestion, take 1 cup nutmeg infusion as required.
  • To boost libido, drink a small glass of nutmeg liqueur whenever necessary.

Infusion: Grate a pinch of nutmeg into 1 cup just-boiled water; sweeten to taste, then drink.

Nutmeg Liqueur: grate 1 1/2 nutmegs into 600 ml (2 1/2 cups) brandy or cognac. Steep for 3 weeks, then strain and bottle.

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INFUSION

Steep the recommended quantity of leaves or flowers of the herb in one cup of just-boiled water for 10 minutes (this makes one dose). Strain before drinking, or leave the herbs as sprigs and simply remove them. Always cover infusions if you intend to store them, and use them within 24 hours. Drink hot or cold.


DECOCTION

Place the relevant quantity of herbs in 800ml cold water (makes three doses) in a pan. Boil, then simmer for 1 hour to reduce the liquid by a third. Strain through a fine sieve into a jug and store, in a cool place, for up to 24 hours. Drink hot or cold.


TINCTURE

Tinctures can be used to prepare roots or leaves. They include alcohol and water to extract the properties from the herbs which would not be available if a water preparation alone was used. It is possible to replace the alcohol with glycerol or vinegar.

A tincture will last for up to two years, which makes it a very convenient method if you intend long-term use of the herbs.


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